DR. NEAL HOUSTON

Adult Integrative/Behavioral Health Specialist

The Life Therapy Group®™ Mental Health & Life Wellness Site

MJA Healthcare Network

• Anxiety • Abuse Treatment and Prevention • Behavioral Health • Behavioral Health Care Research • BiPolar • Body/Mind Relaxation • Biofeedback Therapy and Training • Coping (Life Wellness) • Counseling Services • Depression • Social Anxiety Disorder • Depression • Mental Health Issues • Mindfulness • PTSD • Psychology Services • Sadness • Schizophrenia (Mental Health Treatment) • Stress Relieving
English French German Spain Italian Dutch Russian Portuguese Japanese Korean Arabic Chinese Simplified

"Action-oriented, Solution-Based Approach, Concentrate on Forward motion, not Looking at the Past"

Changing Minds, Transforming Lives - Life Can Work When You Get The Right Support

PROVIDING INTEGRATIVE HEALTH & COGNITIVE BEHAVIOR ENHANCEMENT SERVICES TO ADULTS IN A FLEXIBLE & PERSONALIZED APPROACH.
WHILE OFFERING AFFORDABLE INDIVIDUALIZED SERVICES FOR EFFECTIVE TREATMENT.

Thursday, May 9, 2013

SYMPTOMS of DEPRESSION


SYMPTOMS of DEPRESSION

EDUCATION & AWARENESS







First, you have to recognize your symptoms. This is the first level of awareness (even before you start working on your thinking). Depressed people often don't recognize the symptoms of depression. They miss or misinterpret them. They believe acting and feeling depressed are natural parts of their personality-not symptoms of an emotional disorder.


Many depressed people believe their feelings are dead. They don't see this as a sign of depression, rather they have it as a sign that they are uncaring. Others deny and cover-up their negative feelings.

So, first you must become aware of your symptoms: those times when you're acting or feeling depressed. This is crucial because it sets the stage for change. Below are some ways you can become more aware of your symptoms:

1. Pay attention to your mood changes. When you start to feel sad, gloomy, ashamed, bored, lonely, or rejected, tune in to what's going on inside your head (thoughts), or how you're feeling. These are also important clues to your thinking.

2. Own your own feelings. If you're having trouble recognizing your feelings, start talking about them. Tell people how your honestly feeling at any given moment.

3. Be alert to your body. This is a clue to your emotions. Butterflies in your stomach can be anxiety; heaviness in your limbs can be a clue to sadness. Notice your posture, your facial expressions, how you're walking and moving.

4. Label your avoidance. Keep a lookout for people, places, and activities that you had enjoyed but are now avoiding. Forget about the reason why you're avoiding them, just see when you do.

5. Watch for times when you're confidence disappears. Are there times and places when you ask others for help? Ask yourself, were you able to handle this on your own before? Remember, this loss of confidence can be a symptom of depression.

6. Look for activities that require great effort. Do you have to force yourself to make or return phone calls or text messages? Or have trouble completing tasks around the house?

7. Become aware of those times you have trouble concentrating or making decisions. Do you waver in mind or opinion for simple decisions? Second-guess yourself? These can be symptoms of depression.


EDUCATION & AWARENESS - ARE KEY!!!